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Take Heart South Dakota to Hold Free CPR Event to Increase Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survival

This event will offer four training sessions tailored to specific audiences that will teach the essential components of high performance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

Train the Trainer Event on Wednesday, January 6 at Sanford USD Medical Center.
 
(Sioux Falls, SD) – Each year, an estimated 325,000 Americans die from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). This top killer can strike anyone, at any age, without warning. The majority of sudden cardiac arrests occur during everyday activities, not in a hospital setting so everyone needs to be prepared to manage early resuscitation if the need arises.
 
Sanford Heart Hospital is the premier partner of Take Heart South Dakota, a new statewide, comprehensive initiative designed to increase survival rates of SCA. As part this initiative to save lives, Sanford will hold a free Train the Trainer event on Wednesday, January 6 at Sanford USD Medical Center.
This event will offer four training sessions tailored to specific audiences that will teach the essential components of high performance cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The training sessions will focus on coordinated care and technology for the general public, first responders (police/fire) and emergency medical services (ambulance), as well as post-resuscitation care in the hospital. Each session will include a presentation and question and answer session to follow.
 
“Building community awareness is an important part of the Take Heart South Dakota initiative,” said Scott Pham, MD, electrophysiologist at Sanford Heart Hospital and co-founder of Take Heart South Dakota. “This event will provide first responders, hospital staff and the general public with the information and tools to educate and reeducate the essentials of CPR and tips for training others in their community and family.”
 
 
CPR Training Session Agenda 
 Healthcare Providers: 1-2 p.m.
Lower Level Meeting Room A
 
EMS and First Responders: 2:30-3:30 p.m.
Lower Level Meeting Room A
 
General Public: 4-5 p.m. **POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER
Lower Level Meeting Room A
 
EMS and First Responders: 6-7 p.m. **POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER
Schroeder Auditorium
 
For more information or to register, please contact Erica DeBoer
at (605) 333-7065 or email deboere@sanfordhealth.org. 
 
 
Take Heart America™
Take Heart South Dakota is part of a nationwide initiative called Take Heart America™. Take Heart America™ was founded by a network of visionaries who recognized that a coordinated, comprehensive approach to resuscitation therapies would substantially increase sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survival rates from 5 percent with conventional treatment to 30-35 percent with aggressive resuscitation. Building community awareness is paramount to the Take Heart America strategy for saving lives. Teaching cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and encouraging those who have been trained to act when necessary can significantly increase a SCA victim’s chance of survival. The strategy to deploy automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in residential communities and public places along with improving the resuscitation techniques of professional rescuers will also increase the chances for the victim to survive and resume a productive life.
 
 
About Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)
Often mistakenly referred to as a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is a condition in which the heart abruptly stops without warning. Most sudden cardiac arrest episodes are caused by the rapid and/or chaotic activity of the heart known as ventricular tachycardia (VT) or ventricular fibrillation (VF). These are abnormalities of the heart’s electrical conduction system. SCA is the leading cause of death throughout the world. Cardiac arrest is reversible in most victims if it’s treated within minutes, but the only effective treatment is the delivery of an electrical shock, either with an automated external defibrillator (AED) or with a stop watch sized implantable defibrillator.