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Which Suncreen To Buy

"You want to make sure it's protective of at least 15 or higher," Dr. Scott VanKeulen said. Doctors say you should also look for a sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays.

"They both cause skin problems and skin cancer," VanKeulen said. Once you've made your selection, it's time to lather it on. "You want to reapply every couple of hours especially if you're in the water or sweating but they recommend it every 80 or 90 minutes," VanKeulen said.

If you think wearing a t-shirt protects you against harmful rays, Sanford Emergency Physician Dr. Scott VanKeulen says that's not the case.

"If you can see through something and the light is penetrating, it has very low SPF and if you get it wet, it has even less than that," VanKeulen said.

Doctors at Sanford Hospital are seeing severe sunburns this summer mainly because they say patients are forgetting to put on sunscreen.

"A lot of times people are swimming, they're washing it off, not reapplying it and so it makes it much worse, that's is why we're getting most of our sunburns," VanKeulen said.

And it's easy to forget on a day like today. But even with the clouds, the rays are still there, you just can't see them.

"This is when people feel they don't need too, but 80 percent of the sun's rays are still able to get through and give you a sunburn," VanKeulen said. I

f you do end up getting a minor burn, VanKeulen says to apply aloe vera and take Tylenol. Don't forget about applying sunscreen on the top of your scalp, nose and ears -- as those are the places most prone to skin cancer.