My Sanford Chart allows you secure online access to your personal health information and your child's health information. It's available anywhere you have internet access. There is no cost to you and registering is quick and simple.

Sign Up for My Sanford Chart

Thirty Something and Pregnant

The joy of pregnancy for a woman in her thirties can be clouded by the risks associated with her age and pregnancy. The risks are real, but understanding these risks and meeting with a healthcare professional is the best way to avoid complications during pregnancy.

The joy of pregnancy for a woman in her thirties can be clouded by the risks associated with her age and pregnancy. The risks are real, but understanding these risks and meeting with a healthcare professional is the best way to avoid complications during pregnancy.

While the majority of women in their thirties have uneventful pregnancies, there is a higher risk for developing certain complications. A woman’s fertility begins to decrease, which can make it more difficult for a woman over 35 to become pregnant. Gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, delivering a low birth weight baby and/or delivering prematurely are also possibilities.

At this age, a woman’s chances of delivering a baby with a birth defect also increase. Down syndrome is more common in children born to women over the age of 35. Amniocentesis and other forms of prenatal testing can rule out these defects and give a woman in her thirties just as good a chance to deliver a healthy baby as a younger woman.

The fact there are many risks for a pregnant woman over the age of thirty-five should not discourage a woman from conceiving. Peter Van Eerden, MD with Sanford Clinic Maternal-Fetal Medicine suggests these helpful hints:
• If you're trying to get pregnant, up your intake of omega-3 amino acids, they have been shown to help with the brain development and visual acuity of your unborn baby.
• Make sure you're getting enough folic acid. The benefit of folic acid has been well documented in research studies and is one of the most important recommendations for women considering pregnancy. Good food sources of folic acid include asparagus, black-eyed peas, kidney beans and orange juice.
• Stay away from caffeinated beverages, including coffee, tea, soft drinks, cocoa and chocolate. Drink more skim milk, 100 percent fruit juice, or water with a squeeze of lemon.

Following these basic rules of pregnancy can lower the risks of developing any complications. A healthy diet, good prenatal care and regular doctor visits can help to ensure the delivery of healthy baby. To learn more or enroll in Sanford Women’s Over 30 Childbirth Class, call (605) 328-8800.