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The Heart Vascular Hospital at Sanford First in Six State Region to use New Drug Eluting Stent

Adam Stys, MD, with Sanford Clinic Heart Partners, is the first physician in the six state region to use a new drug eluting stent for a patient suffering from coronary artery disease.

Adam Stys, MD - Sanford Clinic Heart Partners
Adam Stys, MD - Sanford Clinic Heart Partners

(Sioux Falls, SD) Adam Stys, MD, with Sanford Clinic Heart Partners, is the first physician in the six state region to use a new drug eluting stent for a patient suffering from coronary artery disease. On July 7, 2008 Dr. Stys deployed multiple XIENCE™ V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stents.

XIENCE™ V Everolimus Eluting Coronary Stent System for the treatment of coronary artery disease was approved for use by the FDA July 2, 2008. XIENCE™ V represents the new generation of drug eluting stents (DES) with improved design, making it more flexible and yet very effective compared to the first generation of DES. “It is flexible and resilient, which makes it easier and safer to place in the artery. Sanford Heart Partners are committed to bringing the newest and best technology to the region. We routinely monitor technology advances abroad and travel to get experience before FDA releases them in the United States. This was the case with the XIENCE™ V which I have used before in Europe,” says Dr. Stys.

The Heart & Vascular Hospital at Sanford offers various types of stents, including all DES types approved in the United States, to best fit the patient’s needs.

The XIENCE V drug coated stent is used to treat coronary artery disease by keeping open a narrowed or blocked artery and releasing the drug, everolimus, in a controlled manner to prevent the artery from becoming blocked again following a stent procedure. Coronary artery disease occurs when plaque build-up narrows the arteries and reduces blood flow to the heart, which can lead to chest pain or a heart attack.

Dr. Adam Stys attended medical school at Warsaw University Medical School and received his Fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease at State University of New York in Stony Brook, NY. Dr. Stys holds five board certifications including Interventional Cardiology by the American Board of Internal Medicine. He specializes in cardiology, interventional cardiology, nuclear medicine, peripheral interventions, vascular medicine and vascular percantaneous interventions.


Contact:
Stacy Bauer Jones | Media Relations Coordinator
(605) 328-7056 | jonesst@sanfordhealth.or