New Procedure Offers Non-Surgical Method of Permanent Birth Control

Women across the United States are discovering a nonsurgical method of birth control, now available at Sanford Clinic Women’s Health. Called Essure, the procedure allows doctors to provide women an alternative to traditional procedures such as laparoscopic tubal ligations.

Women across the United States are discovering a nonsurgical method of birth control, now available at Sanford Clinic Women’s Health. Called Essure, the procedure allows doctors to provide women an alternative to traditional procedures such as laparoscopic tubal ligations.

“I’m excited to offer my patients Essure as a method of permanent birth control. The procedure is a convenient option for women who want permanent birth control without having to undergo abdominal incisions and general anesthesia,” says Ashley Briggs, MD, Sanford Clinic Women’s Health.

Currently, an estimated 700,000 American women undergo incisional tubal ligation each year — making it the most common form of birth control in the country. Tubal ligation requires incisions to be made in the abdomen under general or regional anesthesia with a four to six day recovery period. Essure allows doctors to place a soft micro-insert in the fallopian tubes, using a minimally invasive catheter. Once in place, the inserts cause tissue growth around the device, forming a barrier that locks the fallopian tubes.

Because the procedure does not require any incisions or general anesthesia, patients are able to leave the doctor’s office in less than an hour after the procedure, with most patients returning to work the next day. Side effects are minimal and may include cramping and nausea.

Essure is:

  • 99.80% effective (based on 4 years of clinical data) 
  • Covered by most health insurance plans 
  • No cutting into the body 
  • Quick recovery 
  • Can be performed in the office with minimal anesthesia 
  • Hormone free

The Essure procedure is irreversible, so ideal candidates for this form of permanent birth control are women who are finished having children, who have not had a prior infection in their fallopian tubes and who don’t have allergies to nickel, says Dr. Briggs.

“The procedure is ideal for many of my patients because it is as effective as other methods of permanent birth control, but is minimally-invasive, and allows women to avoid the risks associated with anesthesia and abdominal surgery,” says Dr. Briggs.

Essure is an affordable method of permanent birth control and is covered by most insurance plans. To learn more about Essure, visit www.sanfordwomenshealth.org or call Sanford Clinic Women’s Health at (605) 328-7700.