Go Red for Women



Go Red For Women encourages awareness of the issue of women and heart disease, and also action to save more lives. The movement harnesses the energy, passion and power women have to band together and collectively wipe out heart disease. It challenges them to know their risk for heart disease and take action to reduce their personal risk. It also gives them the tools they need to lead a heart healthy life.

More women die of cardiovascular disease than from the next four causes of death combined, including all forms of cancer. But 80 percent of cardiac events in women could be prevented if women made the right choices for their hearts involving diet, exercise and abstinence from smoking. Make it your mission to learn all you can about heart attacks and stroke — don’t become a statistic.

Sanford Health is proud to partner with organizations that share our passion for improving heart health. Together, we educate, raise research funding and promote heart-healthy, active lifestyles. We envision a future where friends and family live free of heart disease and stroke. That future starts today. Sanford takes part in AHA’s Go Red and many other causes to encourage habits that prevent heart disease and provide faster, more effective response rates to heart attacks.

While heart event symptoms in men and women differ, preventive measures stay the same. These include:

  • Maintaining a resting blood pressure that is no higher than 120/80
  • Knowing family history
  • Keeping total cholesterol levels under 200
  • Exercising for 30-60 minutes three or more times a week
  • Quitting smoking
  • Maintaining a healthy Body Mass Index
  • Eating a heart-healthy
  • Controlling diabetes
  • Practicing relaxation and reducing stress

For a listing of events click here.

For more information on Sanford Heart click here.

For more information on women’s heart health and how to prevent or treat heart disease, visit Go Red for Women.

Posted Date: January 2012

Go Red for Women

Make it Your Mission to Fight Heart Disease in Women