Internship Requirements

Orientation

All students start the clinical training with one week of orientation. This orientation typically includes:

  1. Mandatory employee education, training and testing.
  2. Laboratory safety training.
  3. Review of student policies and procedures.
  4. Introduction to phlebotomy.
  5. Introduction to laboratory specific skills and departments.
  6. Introduction to the Sanford Library System.
  7. Introduction and training in the SCC laboratory information system.

Sanford Health is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. A pre-orientation meeting is also held in February of the spring prior to the beginning of the internship year. The meeting is attended by the program director, education coordinator, academic program directors and both current and future students. This meeting allows time for both current and future students to interact and allows future students the opportunity to meet each other. Issues discussed deal with student policies, the intensity of the program, dress code, vacation days, etc.

Phlebotomy

Phlebotomy, or the technique of obtaining a blood specimen, is an integral part of the internship process. The process involves not only the actual collection of a proper specimen but also all of the customer service interaction that is inherent in the process of blood collection. All interns will be instructed on proper phlebotomy techniques for both outpatient and inpatient collections, appropriate specimens for testing requirements, customer service and legal ramifications of invasive procedures. Interns will continue with actual blood drawing (venipuncture) processes until competency has been acquired and then periodically throughout the internship to maintain competency.

Hematology

Students spend ten weeks in three rotations training in hematology. Students perform specimen processing, instrumentation, blood cell differentials and miscellaneous testing. Students are evaluated on the basis of their professional capabilities, competency at performing routine testing, a case study report, proficiency at identification of unknown case study differentials, completion of worksheets, weekly testing and completion of a final exam. Students receive approximately 40 didactic lectures on hematology and are evaluated on the basis of unit examinations and a Kodachrome slide examination.

Chemistry

Students spend ten and a half weeks training in chemistry. During the first two rotations, the student will spend time on five major areas of chemistry including general chemistry, toxicology, miscellaneous testing, specific protein and immunological testing along with customer communication and interaction and lab flow. The second two rotations include hormone testing, serological testing and a review of all previous knowledge and skills. Students are evaluated on the basis of their professional capabilities, competency at performing testing, chemistry presentation, weekly rotational exams and worksheets and a comprehensive final exam. Students receive approximately 45 didactic lectures on chemistry and are evaluated on the basis of unit examinations and worksheets.

Coagulation

Students spend one and a half weeks separated into two rotations. During the first rotation basic instrumentation and testing along with case studies are presented and performed. The second rotation involves specialty coagulation testing and case studies. Students are evaluated on the basis of their professional capabilities, competency at performing routine testing, case studies and both weekly and final exam. Students receive approximately 20 didactic lectures and evaluated on the basis of examinations and worksheets given during the lecture series.

Immunohematology

Students spend ten weeks in three rotations learning blood group system serology, component preparation, antibody identification and blood product selection for patients. Students are evaluated on the basis of their professional capabilities, competency at performing routine tests and component preparation, proficiency at recognizing and solving serological problems, case study or research paper, weekly exams during first rotation and completion of a final comprehensive exam. Students receive approximately 45 didactic lectures on transfusion medicine and are evaluated on the basis of five lecture exams and case studies.

Immunology

Students spend one week in serology/immunology observing and performing manual serological test methods. Students are evaluated on their professional skills, competency at performing the manual tests, completion of a serology worksheet and their ability to write and perform an immunological procedure using the manufacturers package insert. Students receive approximately 25 lectures on basic immunology and diagnostic techniques. Evaluation is based on examinations and case studies given during the lecture series.

Microbiology/Molecular Diagnostics

Students spend twelve weeks in training on bacteriology benches with added exposure to virology, parasitology, specimen processing and culture inoculation. Students are evaluated on the basis of their professional capabilities, competency at performing routine testing, case study reports, proficiency of identification of unknowns, a formal case study presentation and examinations. Students receive 95 lectures on microbiology topics including bacteriology, parasitology, mycology, mycobacteriology, virology and molecular diagnostics. Evaluation is based on examinations and worksheets given during lectures.

Microscopy

Students spend three weeks in one rotation training on the urinalysis bench with exposure to specimen processing and routine physical, chemical and microscopic analysis of urine. Students are evaluated on the basis of their professional capabilities, competency at performing routine testing, study questions, proficiency at the analysis of unknowns, acceptable completion of an on-line education course with competencies and completion of a final exam. Students receive approximately 20 didactic lectures on urinalysis and evaluations are based on examinations and worksheets given during the lecture series.

Professional Topics

The professional topics course provides discussion, lectures and learning experiences for clinical laboratory management, quality systems, ethics, educational methodologies and research practice. This course is also the culminating experience in which students are expected to integrate their academic and clinical rotation training to extend, critique and apply knowledge gained in the clinical laboratory science major. Students have approximately eight didactic lectures on clinical laboratory management, which includes principles applicable to the purchase of current laboratory instrumentation and information systems, four hours on educational methodologies and six hours on research design and practice. Students are evaluated on the basis of examinations and the submission of a culminating document or presentation.